Queensland Limb Reconstruction Clinic

Limb Reconstruction Surgery

Paediatric Orthopaedics

Adult Hip

Adult Knee

The QLRC has been established with the intention of providing an Orthopaedic Service that is able to treat both adults and children for a range of orthopaedic problems from Paediatric Sports Injury to Adult Limb Reconstruction surgery. Our aim is to assist our patients in achieving their best possible function and quality of life.

We appreciate that contemplating surgery for yourself or for your child can be an intimidating prospect. We pride ourselves on delivering a service that provides a thorough assessment of your condition as well as the most up to date and evidence based treatment options. It is our aim to communicate this with you so that you have an appreciation of your diagnosis with clear explanation of your treatment options and management plan.

Our ultimate priority will always be the best possible standard of care for you or your child. Please feel free to browse our website and please send us an email if you have any questions.

Latest News

COVID-19 UPDATE

Dear Patients, Families and Friends…

As we slowly start returning our lives to normal and we see relaxation  of the regulations that have limited our activity and sporting interests,  we urge you to return to sport safely and with the risk of overuse injury in mind. The injury rate following CV-19 has been significantly higher in many professional sporting teams and we are keen to ensure that this is not reflected in our younger athletes who are going to return to high level sport following 8 weeks of minimal activity.  Dr Maine and Physiotherapist Mr David Peirce recently held a webinar on managing our return to sport. If you are interested in understanding more about this then please feel free to view it in our facebook feed below. 

You will now be aware that the government has advised that elective surgery can be performed. We are still limited in many ways by social distancing guidelines and ask that you please be patient and as flexible as possible as we try to negotiate theatre spots as efficiently and quickly as we can. We can assure you that we will not be compromising the care of any patient. We are still offering telehealth consults for appointments that do not have to be attended in person. 

We encourage our current patients to contact our rooms for phone and online consults if they have any queries or concerns.

Are you worried about the shape of your child’s legs or feet???

The Alignment Screening in Kids clinic (ASK) is a service run by Paediatric Physiotherapist Alana Jessop in conjunction with Dr Maine. Alana has an extensive background in managing children with bow legs, knock knees, intoeing and gait abnormalities. She has treated children prior, during and following correction of these problems when it has been necessary. She has also got extensive experience managing children who do not require surgery.

It is very rare for a child under the age of 7 to need surgery to correct alignment issues and it can be difficult to get an appointment with a paediatric orthopaedic surgeon if you are concerned about your child. The ASK clinic enables you to quickly access Alana’s experience about your child’s legs. You will be able to get an informed opinion as well as management strategies to help with the problem. If there is an ongoing issue, Alana is easily able to refer you to Dr Maine for a surgical opinion should it be necessary.

Latest Posts

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Back in March an inspiring 10 year old patient Carter had to have an ACL Reconstruction after a sporting injury.
Over the last few months he has worked extremely hard with his rehabilitation and decided to compete in a “Push Up Challenge” for mental health.

His aim was to complete 3318 push ups in 25 days, which he succeeded in doing.

He left his last 20 for when he came in to see Dr Maine, which they completed together 💙

We are so proud of your hard work and dedication!

WELL DONE BUDDY!! 🙌

Gemma Bush
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Comment on Facebook

Carter is a champion and his dedication and commitment is a reflection as the amazing parents, sister and family he has. Not only was it an amazing effort given the extent of his injury at that age, he also had a real personal connection, understanding and passion for the reason he was doing the push ups at such a young age. Young Australian of the Year 🎖

Well done young man. So kind of you to leave the last few to do with Dr Maine. She is exceptional

What a wonderful post! Well done Carter! And Dr Maine for keeping up!

Excellent work

Facing Fears and Making it Fun!!

Recently our Practice Manager Bek and her 11 year old daughter challenged themselves by completing a zip line experience that had both ladies feeling very proud of themselves.
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Facing Fears and Making it Fun!!

Recently our Practice Manager Bek and her 11 year old daughter challenged themselves by completing a zip line experience that had both ladies feeling very proud of themselves.

Young athletes and their knees:
The Queensland Children’s Hospital states that, “Australia has the highest incidence of ACL injuries in the world, and sports injuries are now primary reasons for admission of youths to hospital.” The QCH have embarked on one of the world's first paediatric ACL registries. It’s something
I’m passionate about and will hopefully be able to share the results shortly!
To see the latest information about this, visit our website www.qldlrc.com.au.
In the meantime, here’s a photo from an inspirational 9yo who’s ACL I reconstructed recently:
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Young athletes and  their knees:
The Queensland Children’s Hospital states  that, “Australia has the highest incidence  of ACL injuries in the world, and sports  injuries are now primary reasons for  admission of youths to hospital.” The QCH  have embarked on one of the worlds first  paediatric ACL registries. It’s something
I’m passionate about and will hopefully be  able to share the results shortly!
To see the latest information about this,  visit our website www.qldlrc.com.au.
In the meantime, here’s a photo from an inspirational 9yo who’s ACL I reconstructed recently:

Comment on Facebook

Am hoping you will be impressed this Friday with his progress Dr Maine... he has been working so very hard

The limits of a healthy obsession.

I recently listened to an inspirational montage of Kobe Bryant’s life philosophy. He was one of the NBA’s best players before he passed away in a helicopter crash in 2020.
Bryant was well known for an incredible work ethic combined with single minded determination and self-belief. The #metoomovement had not yet been born and as the father of four daughters, the allegations of sexual assault levelled against him were largely forgotten at the time of his death. Love him or not, his character and renowned “killer instinct” facilitated his achievements both on the court and later off the court as an entrepreneur and business owner.
One statement that Bryant made in particular surprised me. He said that he surrounded himself with obsessive people. I had to stop and think- obsession is not something I usually associate as being a positive character trait .And why would he want to have such people around?
Then it dawned on me that I too had, shall we say, obsessive tendencies.
One of my most unhealthy obsessive states was while studying for the surgical primary exam where we sat a 4 week prep course in Dunedin just prior to the paper. With no family distractions, work or activities that could drag us back to the reality of a normal existence, we breathed, ate and dreamt anatomy, pathology and physiology.
We woke at 6am, did 2 hours of multiple choice questions before breakfast, then studied all day. After this, it was practice papers before dinner and another 4 hours before bed at 11.30pm or midnight.
have a pictorial brain and I learn by drawing. I draw on everything and often create large wall covering posters that integrate a number of different elements of a topic. At the end of the 6 weeks, my room looked like something out of a crazed serial killer movie. I have always sat every exam with the intention of sitting it once and I have thankfully never needed to sit one twice.
Successful people are often so because they are obsessed with a topic. So I’m not surprised Bryant surrounded himself with them-it meant he has the best around him. The best physiotherapist, trainers, doctors, other athletes.
That would allow him to perform at his best.
As doctors, surgeons and clinicians we’re all a little obsessed with what we do, are we not? I can confidently say from personal experience
That I could never have done that without the support network I had around me –many as obsessed as I was. A certain level of obsession is essential, however, too much and it can lead to unhealthy behaviour and an unpleasant experience of life. Moderation is the key. Having people around us who can both tolerate and promote that it key.
Luckily for me, the exams always had an end date. At the same time, without the people
in our lives to ground us, and support us, our obsessions can take over. There is a significant part of me that yearns for the immersion that obsession creates, however as an older and hopefully wiser part of me recognises that a healthy approach to life and the welfare of the people around me are just as, if not more important.
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The limits  of a healthy  obsession.

I recently listened to an inspirational montage of  Kobe Bryant’s life philosophy. He was one of the  NBA’s best players before he passed away in a  helicopter crash in 2020.
Bryant  was  well known  for an incredible work  ethic combined with single minded determination  and self-belief. The #metoomovement had  not yet been born and as the father of four  daughters, the allegations of sexual assault  levelled against him were largely forgotten at the  time of his death. Love him or not, his character  and renowned “killer instinct” facilitated his  achievements both on  the court and  later off the  court as an entrepreneur and business owner.
One statement that Bryant made in particular surprised me. He  said that  he surrounded himself  with obsessive people. I had to stop and think-  obsession is not something I usually associate as  being a positive character trait .And why would he want to have such people around?
Then it dawned on me that I too had, shall we  say, obsessive tendencies.
One of my most unhealthy obsessive states  was while studying for the surgical primary exam where we sat a 4 week prep course in  Dunedin just prior to the paper. With no  family distractions, work or activities that could drag  us back to the reality of a normal existence, we  breathed, ate and dreamt anatomy, pathology  and physiology.
We  woke at 6am, did 2 hours of multiple choice  questions before breakfast, then studied all day.  After this, it was practice papers before dinner  and another 4 hours before bed at 11.30pm or  midnight.
have a pictorial brain and I learn by  drawing. I draw on everything and often  create large wall covering posters that  integrate a number of different elements of  a topic.  At the end of the 6 weeks, my room  looked like something out of a crazed serial  killer movie. I have always sat every exam  with the intention of sitting it once and I have  thankfully never needed to sit one twice.
Successful people are often so because  they are obsessed with a topic. So I’m not  surprised Bryant  surrounded  himself with them-it meant he has the best around him. The best  physiotherapist, trainers, doctors, other athletes.
That would allow him to perform at his best.
As doctors, surgeons and clinicians we’re all a  little obsessed with what we do, are we not? I  can confidently say from personal experience
That I could never have done that without the  support network I had around me –many as  obsessed as I was. A certain level of obsession  is essential, however, too much and  it can lead  to unhealthy behaviour and an unpleasant  experience of life. Moderation is the key. Having  people around us who can both tolerate and  promote that it key.
Luckily for me, the exams always had an end  date. At the same time, without the people
in our lives to ground  us, and support us, our  obsessions can take over. There is a significant  part of  me that yearns for the immersion  that obsession creates, however as an older and  hopefully wiser part of me recognises that a  healthy approach to life and the welfare of  the people around me are just as, if  not more  important.

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Your obsessions make you a wonderful doc. I think once the exams are over it seems an obsession to do good a find answers for patients takes over 💕

Mate that post shows emotional intelligence off the scale.......your insight is a credit too you.......be passionate but don’t tip over into unhealthy obsession.......put it in to action my friend👍🏻😁

It is what makes the difference between excellence and good

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Contact us

Phone: (07) 3177 2779
Fax: (07) 3188 7649
Email: reception@maineorthopaedics.com.au